CEDO, a newly established Coalition for Fair Digital Education in the Netherlands, has recently launched a manifesto and a petition for privacy-friendly education. The coalition consists of parents, teachers, IT professionals and privacy advocates. Privacy First has for years been concerned about the increasing lack of privacy of children and school pupils. We therefore strongly support this initiative.

CEDO notes that public education – i.e. today’s digital learning systems – are dominated by a handful of tech giants and is deeply worried that fundamental rights, such as the privacy of children, parents and teachers, cannot be adequately safeguarded.

Whether it concerns the processing and storage of digital educational projects or the use of email services, online notepads and video tools, the digital infrastructure of Dutch education is almost entirely in the hands of foreign companies such as Google and Microsoft. This can be convenient – it allowed for homeschooling to come off the ground quickly during the first Covid lockdowns for example – but these companies restrict the right to privacy and are not transparent about what happens with the data they collect.

The presence of Big Tech in education means that digital security of pupils cannot be guaranteed by schools. In fact, children lose control over their data as early as kindergarten. They are offered only limited and one-sided knowledge of the products they use, instead of the (digital) skills to learn critical thinking.

The coalition therefore advocates an alternative way of designing digital learning environments, one that does indeed safeguard public values and autonomy in education.

Digital education must and can be organized differently! 

Sign the petition HERE and support the manifesto!

Published in Online Privacy

Recently, the Netherlands Standardisation Forum issued an advice to the government to ensure that public Wi-Fi networks for guest use are always secure. The independent advisory body recommends improving Wi-Fi security by using the WPA2-Enterprise standard. This recommendation applies to all public and semi-public institutions in the Netherlands and therefore has an impact on thousands of Wi-Fi networks.

The Standardisation Forum facilitates digital cooperation (interoperability) between government organizations and between government, businesses and citizens. It is the advisory body for the public sector regarding the use of open standards. According to its own website, all standards that the Forum recommends have been thoroughly tested, lower costs and reduce the risk of internet fraud and data abuse. The recent recommendation came after a request over a year ago by Privacy First and Wi-Fi roaming provider Publicroam. Privacy First and Publicroam requested the Forum to mandate WPA2-Enterprise as the standard for access to guest Wi-Fi. The Standardization Forum then decided to conduct further research, resulting in its current opinion.

Stop offering insecure guest Wi-Fi 

Privacy First chairman Paul Korremans is delighted with the advice: "It took a while, but now there is a clear recommendation. The Standardisation Forum calls for the secure provision of guest Wi-Fi, preferably using the WPA2-Enterprise standard. This recommendation creates clarity for all parties involved in setting up and managing public Wi-Fi networks within government institutions. Moreover, the recommendation will likely have a broader effect: in our view, the Forum is saying that we need to stop offering insecure guest Wi-Fi altogether." 

The Netherlands at the vanguard 

The Standardisation Forum made its decision in the summer of 2021 after several expert meetings and a public consultation. The recommendation was added to the existing obligation around WPA2-Enterprise in early September. The Netherlands is one of the first countries to have such an obligation.

WPA2-Enterprise 

Experts consider the standard WPA2-Enterprise (and its successor WPA3-Enterprise) to be the most suitable method for achieving secure Wi-Fi access. The standard is mandatory for Wi-Fi access for government employees and is widely used by businesses and educational institutions among others. Because it is a long-standing open standard, it is widely available and easy to implement.

Published in Online Privacy

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