Thursday, 23 February 2012 16:33

Privacy First Annual Report 2011

"In the first decade of the 21st century the right to privacy in the Netherlands has come under enormous pressure. On the one hand this has been the result of the collective mindset after '9/11', in which there seemed to be ever less room for classic civil rights such as the right to privacy.  On the other hand it was the outcome of rapid technological developments that brought along inherent privacy risks. Examples of this are the rise of the Internet, mobile telephony, camera surveillance and biometrics, all of which are technologies that are intended to serve Mankind but that could just as well disrupt society. For example through abuse or ill-thought out use without proper privacy guarantees. An ICT dream can then quickly turn into a societal nightmare. These observations were the reason the Privacy First Foundation was founded in March 2009. Only a few months later (in the summer of 2009) the first turning point in Dutch society was perceivable: the storage of fingerprints under the new Dutch Passport Act led to a torrent of criticism, courtesy also of the pressure exerted by Privacy First. This subsequently acted as a societal lever:  due to all the fuss surrounding the Passport Act a widely supported Dutch privacy movement came to life. Since then Privacy First has gradually expanded its area of work while the theme of privacy has climbed ever higher on the agenda of Dutch society..."

Read further pdfHERE in Privacy First's annual report 2011!

Published in PR Downloads
Wednesday, 01 February 2012 13:36

Your fingerprints in the Twilight Zone

In almost all of the lawsuits that are pending against the new Dutch Passport Act, there is one important subject that has so far been little exposed: the use of sensitive personal data by secret services. In this case it’s about biometrics: digital facial scans and fingerprints that end up in all sorts of databases through people's passports and ID cards. At the moment those databases are still only in the hands of municipalities and the passport manufacturer in Haarlem (Morpho, previously called Sagem), in the future they will undoubtedly end up elsewhere too, eventually worldwide. In that sense every Dutchman is a potential globetrotter: in the long term your fingerprints and facial scan may be available even in the farthest corners of the world. Not only in the databases of ‘allies’, but also in the databases of countries with which those ‘allies’ have in turn concluded (possibly secret) exchange agreements. And this is all but transparent. Neither is it publicly known what secret services are willing to use our biometrics for. A Privacy First employee who was eager to examine this for the Dutch Scientific Council for Government Policy (Wetenschappelijke Raad voor het Regeringsbeleid, WRR) soon encountered a wall of research restrictions. So for the time being all we can do is guess... Possible intelligence purposes of biometrics are: 1) identification of suspects unwilling to talk and ‘interesting’ persons in public space, 2) recognition of emotions and lie detection, 3) the use or recognition of doubles, 4) espionage, etc. The first purpose (identification) is being facilitated by the Radio-frequency identification (RFID)-aspect of the biometric chip in your passport or ID card. It’s precisely because of this that the chip can be read from a distance.  

Back to the main subject: the use of sensitive personal data by secret services. Today this is as easy as pie: many people unashamedly put half of their private lives on the internet, for instance on Facebook. And if the information can’t be found on the internet, it can be traced in databases of companies and the government. In the way you in your student days perhaps once turned on the TV with a pool cue without leaving your lazy armchair, secret services can nowadays conjure up your whole life including your fingerprints merely at the press of a button. But is this actually allowed? And in this respect, does it make any difference if your fingerprints are stored are stored 1) by the municipality, 2) in a central database or 3) by a passport manufacturer? ‘‘Yes, that’s allowed’’ and ‘‘no, it doesn’t matter where they’re stored’’, the Dutch State consistently implied until mid-2011 through the State attorney:    

‘‘Fingerprints will also have to be supplied to the General Intelligence and Security Service (Algemene Inlichtingen- en Veiligheidsdienst, AIVD) and the Military Intelligence and Security Service (Militaire Inlichtingen- en Veiligheidsdienst, MIVD). The provision of information to these services is regulated in Article 17 of the Intelligence and Security Services Act (Wet op de Inlichtingen- en Veiligheidsdiensten, WIVD). This already applied prior to the coming into force of parts of the modified Passport Act and it will be no different now that it’s been modified. The mention in Article 4b, paragraph 2(d) Passport Act (‘state security’) was merely motivated by transparency reasons.’’
(Source: Statement of Defence in the Passport lawsuit by Privacy First dated 28 July 2010, para. 2.17; repeated word for word in, among other things, the statements of defence of the State in the Passport lawsuits by Van Luijk dated 29 October 2010 & 10 June 2011 (paras.
3.17 & 5.8 respectively) and Deutekom dated 23 November 2010, para. 4.17.)

So there the State claims that basically nothing would change with the introduction of the Passport Act since the AIVD would already have had the opportunity to make a request for your fingerprints. Meanwhile however, the development of a central biometric database has been put on hold which means your fingerprints are stored ‘only’ relatively shortly by the municipality and the manufacturer. From a legal point of view this is what the discussion now revolves around. For instance on 27 October 2011 before a single judge at the district court of Amsterdam:

Judge: ‘‘Yes, I just wondered, madam [State attorney], you’re saying that Mr’s fear that intelligence and security agencies have access to his personal data - his fingerprints and facial scan -, is taken actually away by Article 65 [Passport Act].’’
State attorney: ‘‘Article 65 only applies to fingerprints.’’
Judge: ‘‘Mr [X] has pointed at Articles 17 to 34 of the Intelligence and Security Services Act. How do you see that?’’
State attorney: ‘‘I can very briefly say something about how you should see this in relation to each other. (...) The point is, quite a few things have of course been said about this in the legal history of this case. So when does the possibility of access arise: once you have a central administration with a biometric search function. There are all sorts of regulations but it’s not as if the AIVD could come up with a fingerprint and say to the municipality ‘show us who this fingerprint belongs to’. But that possibility, it isn’t there. There is simply no biometric search function. In that area the only possibility of what municipalities can do in providing fingerprints, is making a print of it, which comes down to: a sheet of paper with dots. That is the rendering on paper of those fingerprints. Provided the AIVD has complied to the regulations under which they can make a request for information on the basis of the WIVD, it could provide a name to the municipality where the person concerned is registered and could then make a request for personal data. For as far as such a request would concern fingerprints, it wouldn’t thus be any more than a printed page with those dots. So it can never happen, and this is the important point, that the AIVD would come up with fingerprints and say: ‘who are these fingerprints from?’’’
Attorney: ‘‘This is not what my client fears. My clients fears that the AIVD says: ‘we want to see the fingerprints of Mr [X]’.’’
State attorney: ‘‘If the AIVD would like to have the fingerprints of Mr [X], then it wouldn’t need the travel documents registration. They’re on these items over here, so to speak, on this cup...’’
Attorney: ‘‘Well I don’t see anyone of the AIVD taking fingerprints of my client, and it’s not just about him, it’s about him saying: ‘I find it to be in conflict with my conscience to cooperate because in that way the fingerprints of all Dutch citizens could be requested for by the AIVD.’ Not just his, but everyone’s.’’
Judge: ‘‘With the legislation that is in place now, would it be practically possible for the AIVD to step up to the municipality of Amsterdam and say: ‘we would like to have the fingerprints of Mr [X]?’’’
State attorney: ‘‘Eeehm, well [inaudible], Article 65 second paragraph [Passport Act] dictates that fingerprints may only be requested for the application and issuance of a passport. As far as the AIVD would be allowed to make a request for those data on the basis of its own legislation, they wouldn’t be able to obtain anything more than those printed dots because the municipality can’t offer anything different than that.’’
Interruption from the audience: ‘‘They can through [passport manufacturer] Morpho.’’
Judge: ‘‘You are not a party in this lawsuit. I have to ask you not to take part in the litigation.’’

So merely a ‘print with dots’, according to the State attorney. Demanding fingerprints at the passport manufacturer unfortunately was not discussed during the court session. Subsequently the case was redirected within the district court of Amsterdam to a court session with three judges. On 25 January 2012 this point of discussion was again briefly discussed:

Judge 3: ‘‘And what if the information is in the hands of the manufacturer?’’
State attorney: ‘‘Eeeeeeeehm... On what basis would the manufacturer be allowed to provide those data?’’
Judge 3: ‘‘That’s what I’m asking you.’’
To this question no clear answer was given by the State attorney, just a vague reference to Article 65, paragraph 2 of the Passport Act. Then a painful silence followed... and the judges didn’t ask any further questions.
Judge 3: ‘‘And Mr [attorney of X], what’s your take on this point?’’
Attorney: ‘‘I have a different view! [laughter from the audience]
The attorney of X subsequently extensively refers to the relevant legal history of the Passport Act and the provisions of the WIVD 2002.
State attorney: ‘‘Even if the AIVD would be able to make a request for fingerprints on the basis of Article 17 WIVD, then they would never get anything more than a printed page with those dots.
(...) They would get a printed page with the fingerprints, which is a printed page with dots.’’ A little later, after having been verbally informed by a civil servant of the Dutch Ministry of the Interior: ‘‘I’ve said something wrong. I said you get a printed page with dots, but now I understand you get a printed page with an image.’’

Hence, after a dozen court sessions about the Dutch Passport Act, the official clarification by the Dutch State on the use of fingerprints by secret services goes as follows: ‘‘a print with an image, from the municipality’’. The question thus remains whether digital requests can also be made to 1) the municipality and 2) the passport manufacturer, and if so, what exactly happens with it. The same goes for facial scans. The upcoming court session in the Passport Act saga will be on Monday, 2 April 2012 (11.00 am) at the Dutch Council of State (Raad van State). It will then be up the Council to clarify this case after all and invite expert witnesses in case necessary.

Update 10 February 2012: As a result of the above article, written questions have been asked by Member of European Parliament Sophie in ‘t Veld to both passport manufacturer Morpho as well as to the European Commission. At the same time Member of the Dutch House of Representatives Gerard Schouw has asked similar Parliamentary questions to the Dutch Minister of the Interior Liesbeth Spies.

Published in Biometrics

"Die Niederlande wollen ab Sommer die Kennzeichen aller einreisenden Fahrzeuge erfassen. Zumindest für 90 Stunden pro Monat.

Die Niederländer haben einigen Ehrgeiz entwickelt, wenn es darum geht zu erklären, dass ihr neues Kamera-Überwachungssystem kein Zeichen dafür ist, dass sie mit den offenen europäischen Grenzen eigentlich gar nicht so zufrieden sind. »Diese Überwachung hat nicht den Charakter früherer Grenzkontrollen«, heißt es auf der Internetseite der niederländischen Botschaft in Berlin. Es gehe einzig darum, Menschenschmuggel, Menschenhandel und Geldwäsche zu verhindern, sagt Gerd Leers, Minister für Einwanderung und Asyl, unter dessen Federführung das Projekt läuft.

Niemand sollte etwas merken

Erklärungen das Ministeriums zum Kamera-Überwachungssystem lesen sich meist wie Rechtfertigungen, und weil man damit gerechnet hat, dass die Maßnahme auf einigen Widerstand treffen wird, sollte sie so eingeführt werden, dass möglichst Wenige etwas davon mitbekommen. Erst als niederländische Medien nachfragten, welchen Zweck die von ihnen entdeckten Kameras an einer Grenzen im Norden des Landes erfüllen, wurde das Projekt öffentlich.

Mittlerweile allerdings ist es für jeden offensichtlich, der über die Autobahn oder eine Nationalstraße in die Niederlande fährt. So zum Beispiel am Grenzübergang Vetschau, wo die A4 in die A76 mündet, in Höhe von Bocholtz. An einem Stahlträger über den Fahrbahnen sind mehrere Kameras in­stalliert. Noch seien sie nicht in Betrieb, sagt René Claessen, Sprecher der Koninklijke Marechaussee (niederländische Nationalpolizei) auf Anfrage unserer Zeitung, die Geräte befänden sich in der Probephase. »Die Kameras werden erst kurz vor dem Sommer aktiviert«, sagt Claessen. Zum Einsatz kommen sie an den 15 meist frequentierten Grenzübergängen. Fünf davon teilen sich die Niederlande mit Belgien, zehn mit Deutschland, die meisten liegen in NRW. Daneben ist geplant, weitere sechs mobile Kameras einzusetzen.

Nach Angaben des Ministeriums wird von allen vorbeifahrenden Fahrzeugen Vorderseite und Nummernschild fotografiert. Die gewonnenen Daten gehen an die Koninklijke Marechaussee, die sie mit eingespeicherten Risikoprofilen abgleicht. Bei einem Treffer wird das Fahrzeug angehalten.

»Umkehrung des Rechtssystems«

Niederländische Datenschützer kritisieren die Grenzüberwachung, die Stiftung »Privacy First« etwa spricht von einem »enormen Eingriff in die Privatsphäre«. Alle Fahrzeuge zu kontrollieren, um etwas Verdächtiges zu finden, sei eine »Umkehrung des Rechtssystems«. Auf einer von niederländischen Datenschützern betriebenen Internetseite (www.sargasso.nl) heißt es, dass die Nationalpolizei durch die Kameras die Möglichkeit bekomme, die Daten einreisender Fahrzeuge mit »allerlei schwarzen Listen abzugleichen«.

Minister Leers widerspricht dem. Die gewonnenen Daten würden übrigens auch nicht gespeichert. Die Kameras registrierten wohl, aus welchem Land ein Fahrzeug komme. Aber das könnte die Nationalpolizei ja jetzt auch schon feststellen, sagt Leers.

Nachdem Deutschland aus Sorge um den freien Verkehr zwischen den Mitgliedsstaaten bei der Europäischen Kommission Klage eingereicht hat, wartet diese auf mehr Informationen aus den Niederlanden. Leers kündigte an, er werde darauf hinweisen, dass die Kameras nicht gegen Datenschutz- oder Grenzkontrollbestimmungen verstießen. Zudem sollen sie höchstens 90 Stunden pro Monat Aufnahmen machen - von permanenter Grenzkontrolle könne keine Rede sein."

Source: Aachener Zeitung 24 January 2012, p. 5.

In November 2011, a German ZDF Television crew visited Privacy First for a quick interview about the new Dutch border surveillance system @MIGO-BORAS. Below is the item from ZDF Heute evening news:

"Mit einem Kamerasystem sollen an der niederländischen Grenze einreisende Autos kontrolliert werden. Kritik an der Überwachung üben sowohl Datenschützer als auch die EU-Kommission.

Wenn eine reflexartige Verteidigungshaltung ein Anzeichen für Nervosität ist, dann ist man dieser Tage wohl ziemlich nervös im niederlän­dischen Immigrationsministerium. Ein Sprecher des Ministers Gerd Leers ließ jedenfalls wissen, dass selbstverständlich »alles ordentlich geregelt« sei beim neuen Hightech-Großprojekt seines Hauses. Dabei hatte die Jungle World lediglich nach dem genauen Betriebsbeginn für das automatische Kamerasystem gefragt, das an 15 Autobahngrenzübergängen in Richtung Belgien und Deutschland installiert wurde und demnächst einreisende Fahrzeuge frontal fotografieren soll.

Über das Datum der Inbetriebnahme will das Ministerium derzeit keine näheren Angaben machen. Bekannt ist hingegen, dass die Kennzeichen mit Hilfe der Technologie »Automatic Number Plate Recognition« gelesen werden. Anfang Januar erklärte Minister Leers im TV- Magazin Eén Vandaag deren Funktionsweise: Überquert ein Fahrzeug mit verdächtigem Nummernschild die Grenze, »gibt das System einen ›Piepton‹ von sich, so dass der Grenzschutz weiß, hier kann etwas vorliegen«. Es würden »nur Verkehrsströme« analysiert, um »illegale Aktivitäten« zu verhindern, aber weder Kennzeichen noch persönliche Daten gespeichert, beteuerte der Christdemokrat.
(...)
Datenschützer überzeugt das nicht. Die Stiftung Privacy First spricht von einem »enormen Eingriff in die Privatsphäre«. Ein solcher sei nur bei konkretem Verdacht einer strafbaren Handlung zu rechtfertigen, sagt Stiftungsdirektor Vincent Böhre. Alle Fahrzeuge zu kontrollieren, um bei irgendeiner Person etwas Verdächtiges zu finden, sei dagegen eine »Umkehrung des Rechtssystems«. Privacy First befürchtet, die gewonnenen Daten könnten je nach Bedarf mit schwarzen Listen der Polizei, der Staatsanwaltschaft oder des Geheimdienstes verglichen werden.

Die Regierung bestreitet diese Absichten. Doch birgt »Amigo-Boras« noch immer die Gefahr des function creep, also der Benutzung der Technologie zu anderen Zwecken als dem ursprünglich vorgesehenen. Wie naheliegend dies im Fall der Grenzkameras ist, zeigt ein Blick auf ein aktuelles Gesetzesvorhaben. Demnach sollen künftig alle mit Kameras ermittelten Kennzeichen, beispeilsweise entlang der Autobahnen, zusammen mit Angaben über Zeitpunkt und Ort der Aufnahme vier Wochen lang gespeichert werden können. Bislang ging das nur, wenn ein bestimmtes Nummernschild im Rahmen polizeilicher Ermittlungen verdächtig war.

Der Journalist Dimitri Tokmetzis, verantwortlich für die Website sargasso.nl, die sich mit Fragen des Datenschutzes befasst, spricht von einer »de facto hundertprozentigen Kontrolle«. Dies verstoße gegen das Schengen-Abkommen. Kritisch äußert er sich auch über den Versuch, ein zukünftiges Verhalten durch die Erstellung eines bestimmten Profils vorhersagen zu wollen. Anhand ihres Nummernschildes würden Menschen mit Hilfe von anderen Kennzeichen wie Autotyp, Zeitpunkt und Häufigkeit des Grenzübertritts kategorisiert. Sowohl seitens der Regierung als auch der Medien wurde in diesem Zusammenhang mehrfach das Bild eines Kleinbusses bemüht, in dem osteuropäische Menschenschmuggler angeblich häufig einreisen.

Inzwischen interessiert sich auch die EU-Kommission für »Amigo-Boras«. Nachdem die deutsche Regierung aus Sorge um den freien Verkehr zwischen den Mitgliedsstaaten eine Klage in Brüssel eingereicht hatte, wurde Cecilia Malmström aktiv. Die EU-Kommisarin für Innenpolitik wandte sich im November mit der Bitte um mehr Informationen an die niederländische Regierung, um sicherzustellen, dass das Schengen-Abkommen durch die Pläne nicht verletzt werde. Zu Jahresbeginn sagte Malmströms Sprecher Michele ­Cercone, das weitere Vorgehen hänge von der Antwort der niederländischen Regierung ab. Laut Minister Leers sei diese Anfang des Jahres zu erwarten. Bis Mitte Januar lag sie noch nicht vor.
(...)
Bereits seit 2005 wird an den Grenzkameras gearbeitet. Die Regierung der Niederlande bemüht sich, Bedenken zu zerstreuen. Nach dem Schreiben Malmströms sagte Minister Leers, die Kameraüberwachung verstoße keinesfalls gegen das Schengen-Abkommen. Beabsichtigt seien nur Stichproben, weshalb die Kameras pro Grenzübergang nicht länger als 90 Stunden monatlich zum Einsatz kämen. Das tägliche Limit soll bei sechs Stunden liegen. Wie eine solche Beschränkung gewährleistet werden soll, sagte der Minister nicht. Vorläufig ist die für Januar geplante Einführung des Grenzüberwachungssystems auf kommenden Sommer verschoben worden. Bis dahin stehe eine »verlängerte Testphase« an. Mit den Mahnungen aus Brüssel, heißt es im Ministerium, habe die Verzögerung aber nichts zu tun. Vielmehr steckten »operationelle Gründe« dahinter."

Read the entire article in German weekly Jungle World HERE, or click HERE for an 'English version' in Google Translate.

"Od početka godine Nizozemska evidentira baš svako vozilo koje ulazi u tu zemlju. Tvrdi kako se time bori protiv švercera, ali njezini susjedi kažu kako je već i to kršenje sporazuma o nesmetanom prometu unutar EU-a.

Ono što je kritičarima osobito sumnjivo jest da se projekt nadzora granica Nizozemske s Njemačkom i Belgijom, nazvan "Amigo boras", isprva trebao provesti daleko od očiju javnosti. Tek kad su novinari počeli ispitivati u vladi u Haagu kakve su to kamere na granicama, objavljeno je kako će se od početka 2012. doista evidentirati registarske oznake svih vozila koja ulaze u zemlju.

Inicijator ovog nadzora jest nizozemsko Ministarstvo za useljeništvo i pitanja azila, na čijem čelu je Gerd Leers. On smatra kako samo takvim, potpunim nadzorom svih vozila i snimkama vozača i suvozača, može konačno stati na kraj švercu i narkotika i osobito ljudi. Tako se osobita pozornost posvećuje kombijima čije registarske oznake potječu sa Balkana i koji su se do sada često pokazali kao prijevozno sredstvo osoba koje nezakonito dolaze u Nizozemsku.

"Ne krši europske odredbe"

Nakon prvih vijesti i prosvjeda zbog takvog potpunog nadzora, nadležne službe tvrde kako su doista, među prometnim znakovima, postavljene kamere na 15 glavnih graničnih prijelaza i kako će se na manjim prijelazima nadzor obavljati iz policijskih vozila, ali kako to ne znači da će se "ometati slobodan protok" građana unutar zemalja potpisnica Šengenskog sporazuma. Drugim riječima, ministar Leers tvrdi kako "to ne predstavlja kršenje europskih propisa".

No građani i političari susjedne Njemačke i Belgije, kao i zaštitnici ljudskih prava u samoj Nizozemskoj, nisu baš uvjereni u to. Nizozemska priznaje da doista, automatskim prepoznavanjem slika s kamera, provjerava baš svaku registarsku oznaku, ali kako će policija doista zaustaviti neko vozilo tek ako računalo onda javi da je možda riječ o osobi koju traži policija - ili ako je auto ukraden. No nije posve jasno, što nizozemska policija čini s tim podacima niti gdje i koliko dugo ih pohranjuje.

Vojna operacija kao "birokratska samovolja"

Bas Filippini iz nizozemske nevladine udruge "Privacy First" smatra ovu mjeru "birokratskom samovoljom" kojom se sumnja na baš svakog građanina koji dolazi u Nizozemsku - i što je još gore, kršenjem načela privatnosti građana koji zapravo jedva da imalo pomaže borbi protiv kriminala. Jer ako kamere doista i snimaju lica vozača i suvozača, malo je izbjeglica koji su kupili svoj auto pa njime stižu u Nizozemsku. Oni su uglavnom nagurani negdje odostraga - što ove kamere uopće ne vide. Filippiniju se sve to čini kao nekakva "vojna operacija" i ne može shvatiti, što je njegovoj vladi bilo da uvodi takve mjere.

I dok se već čuju i sumnje kako Nizozemska ovim projektom slijedi posve drugi cilj - prema broju stranih vozila koja ulaze u zemlju ispitati mogućnost uvođenja cestarina za svoje autoceste, nizozemska vlada se ipak trudi ublažiti dojam kako stvara nekakvu "policijsku državu" i tvrdi kako sustav ionako neće biti uključen neprekidno. Ali nakon prosvjeda i sumnji koje su počele stizati i iz institucija Europske unije, objavila je kako će sustav aktivirati kao "probnu fazu" koja bi trebala potrajati do veljače ili ožujka."

Read the entire article in Deutsche Welle HERE, or click HERE for an 'English version' in Google Translate.

"HAG - Holandija je postavila kamere na svoje granične prelaze koje snimaju sva vozila koja u tu državu ulaze iz Belgije i Njemačke, što kritičari smatraju kao sporno i u tome vide čak i kršenje Šengenskog sporazuma.

Sistem ima naziv "Amigo boras", a cilj mu je da  - prema zvaničnom tumačenju holandskih vlasti - doprinese suzbijanju šverca ljudi. Zbog toga kamere snimaju prednji dio vozila i na snimcima se vide registarska tablica, vozač i suvozač.

Na primjer, posebna pažnja biće obrađena na furgone sa Balkana, jer je iskustvo pokazalo da su u njima u Holandiju prevožene ilegalne prostitutke, i samo u takvim slučajevima policija će smjeti i da zaustavi neki automobil radi kontrole, javlja "Dojče vele".

Mišljenja o novom sistemu kamera su oprečna. Mnogi stanovnici pograničnog područja, kao i putnici koji ulaze u Holandiju, zastupaju mišljenje da onaj ko nema šta da krije, nema čega ni da se plaši. Ali, mnogi ovo vide kao još jedan od poteza kojim država zadire u privatnu sferu građana.

Kritičari ukazuju na to da Šengenski sporazum uopšte ne predviđa opšte granične kontrole. Holandska vlada odgovara da će ove kamere raditi samo povremeno, kako bi u konkretnim slučajevima pomogle graničnoj policiji. Holandska organizacija za zaštitu podataka o ličnosti "Privatnost prvo" smatra da "Amigo boras" stvara generalne profile putnika koji dolaze u Holandiju.

Predsjednik te organizacije Bas Filipini smatra da novi sistem kamera ne može biti efikasan.

"Oni žele da uđu u trag švercerima ljudi, ali ako u automobilima te osobe sede na zadnjim sjedištima, onda ih ionako ne možete vidjeti... Tako ćemo doći do dana kada će snimati sva vozila. Mi želimo da se krećemo bez nadzora", rekao je Filipini, i dodao da mu čitava akcija izgleda kao neki vojni projekat.

Ima i posmatrača koji smatraju da je cilj akcije nešto sasvim drugo, naime, da se ustanovi koliko vozila sa stranim tablicama ulazi u Holandiju, kako bi moglo da se procijeni kakva bi bila korist od uvođenja putarine na tamošnjim auto-putevima.

Prema članu 23 Šengenskog sporazuma, jedna država-članica smije ponovo da uvede kontrolu samo u izuzetnim slučajevima na ograničeno vrijeme, i to ukoliko postoje "velike prijetnje javnom redu ili unutrašnjoj bezbjednosti". Ta mjera smije da traje najduže 30 dana ili onoliko dugo koliko traje "velika prijetnja". Šengenske države su se, na primjer, pozivale na tu klauzulu uoči određenih velikih sportskih priredbi ili političkih samita.

Kritičari novog holandskog sistema nadgledanja granica tvrde da je Holandija oko sebe sagradila "virtuelni zid", Komisija EU trenutno ozbiljno razmatra takve primjedbe i pitanje radi li se o povredi prava na privatnost ili, još opštije gledano, o povredi ljudskih prava."

Read the entire article in Bosnian newspaper Nezavisne Novine HERE, or click HERE for an 'English version' in Google Translate.

"Hightech-Kameras an der niederländischen Grenze sollen einreisende Autofahrer filmen. Die Regierung in Den Haag sieht darin kein Problem.

Deutschen Holland-Touristen kann es demnächst passieren, dass ihr erstes Urlaubsfoto von der niederländischen Grenzpolizei geschossen wird. Automatisch und mit einer Hightech-Kamera. An den fünfzehn meist frequentierten Grenzübergängen der Niederlande sollen diese zum Einsatz kommen. Fünf davon an der Grenze zu Belgien, zehn an der zu Deutschland, dazu kommen sechs mobile Kameras.

Noch befindet sich das Projekt in der Pilotphase. Nach Auskunft der niederländischen Grenzpolizei soll es im Februar oder März starten. Die Regierung in Den Haag begründet diesen Schritt mit der Kriminalitätsbekämpfung, es ginge um "illegale Einreise in Zusammenhang mit Menschenschmuggel, Menschenhandel, Identitätsbetrug und Geldwäsche".

Das System heißt "@migo-boras" und basiert auf einem System zur Nummernschilderkennung, das sich ANPR (automatic number plate recognition) nennt. Abgelichtet werden die Vorderseite und das Nummernschild der Fahrzeuge. Laut Immigrationsminister Gerd Leers ermögliche dies die Aufzeichnung von "Verkehrsmustern", die "auf Basis allgemeiner Daten und Zielgruppenprofilen melden, welches Fahrzeug für eine Kontrolle interessant sein kann". Die gewonnenen Informationen würden umgehend der Grenzpolizei übermittelt, die dann das entsprechende Auto anhalten kann.

EU-Kommission wartet auf Stellungnahme aus Den Haag

Niederländische Datenschützer sind über das Vorhaben besorgt. Die Stiftung Privacy First spricht von einem "enormem Eingriff in die Privatsphäre". Alle Fahrzeuge zu kontrollieren, um bei einem etwas Verdächtiges zu finden, sei eine "Umkehrung des Rechtssystems". Die Datenschutz-Website sargasso.nl befürchtet, die Grenzpolizei habe damit zumindest die Möglichkeit, einreisende Autos gleichzeitig mit "allerlei schwarzen Listen" abzugleichen. Eben dies verneint Immigrationsminister Leers entschieden. Ebenso wenig würden die gewonnenen Informationen gespeichert, immerhin gesteht er ein: "Wohl können die Kameras anhand des Kennzeichens sehen, aus welchem Land ein Auto oder LKW kommt."

So vage diese Argumentation, so spärlich ist die Informationspolitik der Regierung in Sachen Grenzkameras. Fakt ist immerhin, dass zu kurz denkt, wer hier nur die Handschrift der von den Rechtspopulisten abhängigen konservativen Minderheitskoalition zu erkennen glaubt. Seit Jahren schon wird an dem System getüftelt, und bereits 2005 gab es einen ersten Probelauf. Die aktuelle Regierung unter Ministerpräsident Rutte zeichnet sich indes für eine weitere Maßnahme verantwortlich: Sie will Kennzeichen, die von Autobahnkameras im Landesinneren routinemäßig ermittelt wurden, vier Wochen lang speichern. Privacy-Aktivisten befürchten, dass dieser Ansatz auch auf die Bilder der Grenzkameras ausgedehnt wird.

Im Herbst begann sich auch die EU-Kommission für den Fall zu interessieren. Nachdem Deutschland aus Sorge um den freien Verkehr zwischen den Mitgliedsstaaten in Brüssel eine Klage eingereicht hatte, wandte sich EU-Innenkommissarin Cecilia Malmström mit der Bitte um mehr Informationen an die Regierung in Den Haag. Bisher, so Malmströms Sprecher Michele Cercone zu ZEIT ONLINE, warte man auf eine Antwort. Das weitere Vorgehen der Kommission hänge davon ab, wie diese ausfalle. 
(...)
Unklar ist bislang, warum die Testphase des Projekts nun verlängert wurde. Noch im Herbst sollte der Startschuss für @migo-boras am 1. Januar erfolgen. Leers' Sprecher Sander van der Eijk machte "operationelle Gründe" für den Aufschub verantwortlich. Mit dem Schreiben der EU-Kommission jedenfalls habe dieser nichts zu tun."

Read the entire article in Zeit Online HERE, or click HERE for an 'English version' in Google Translate.

"Integracja Europejska. Holandia odgradza się od świata zasłoną elektroniczną

System elektronicznego monitoringu holenderskich granic działa od początku nowego roku na pełnych obrotach. Wyposażony jest na razie jedynie w 15 kamer rejestrujących ruch graniczny na najbardziej uczęszczanych przejściach z Niemcami i Belgią. Dodatkowo sześć policyjnych patroli rejestruje przy użyciu techniki elektronicznej wszystko, co znajduje się w polu widzenia lotnych kamer.

Rząd holenderski przedłużył właśnie do połowy tego roku okres testowania całego systemu. Jeżeli okaże się sprawny, zostanie rozbudowany tak, że na terytorium Holandii nie prześlizgnie się mysz bez wiedzy odpowiednich władz.

Budowę takiej zapory rząd uzasadnia koniecznością wzmożenia wysiłków w walce z zorganizowaną przestępczością, zwłaszcza handlem narkotykami oraz nielegalną imigracją. Tak więc każdy samochód przekraczający holenderską granicę jest fotografowany, a informacje z numerami tablic rejestracyjnych przekazywane do porównania w specjalnej bazie danych. Holenderski rząd wie więc dokładnie, kto, kiedy i jakim samochodem wjeżdża na obszar kraju i jak długo w Holandii pozostaje.
(...)
– Nie może dziwić, że właśnie Dania i Holandia wprowadziły systemy monitoringu swych granic – mówi Joachim-Fritz Vannahme, ekspert Fundacji Bertelsmanna, przypominając o silnych w tych krajach partiach skrajnej prawicy szermujących hasłami zagrożenia przez imigrantów tradycyjnych wartości tych społeczeństw. Holandia użyła nawet weta, protestując przeciwko przyjęciu Bułgarii i Rumunii do strefy Schengen. Wycofała je niedawno pod warunkiem, że kolejne dwa raporty na ten temat przygotowywane przez Brukselę będą pozytywne. Oznacza to, że oba kraje będą mogły wejść do Schengen na wiosnę.

Holandia pragnie się jednak zabezpieczyć. – Wprowadzenie każdego nowego reżimu odmiennego od stanu faktycznego musi być przedmiotem badań, czy nie na narusza porozumień z Schengen – przypomina „Rz" Axel Schäfer, rzecznik niemieckiej SPD ds. europejskich. Nie jest jednak w stanie ocenić, czy holenderski monitoring graniczny jest zgodny z Schengen.

System elektronicznej kontroli na granicach może się stać regułą w strefie Schengen

Zdaniem Vannahme nie można mówić o formalnym naruszeniu tego porozumienia, gdyż przewiduje ono wiele odstępstw od reguły w postaci otwartych granic. Tak było w czasie mistrzostw Europy w piłce nożnej w Belgii i Holandii, kiedy to wprowadzono specjalne systemy kontroli służące identyfikacji chuliganów. Praktyka ta stosowana jest też przy okazji innych wielkich wydarzeń sportowych czy politycznych. Kontrole na granicy są jednak możliwe jedynie w razie poważnego zagrożenia bezpieczeństwa kraju, i to w zasadzie jedynie na 30 dni. Skorzystała z tego nie tak dawno Francja, kontrolując granicę z Włochami.

Nie wiadomo jeszcze, jak długo Holandia zamierza otaczać się elektronicznym murem wywołującym wiele kontrowersji wewnątrz kraju. – Tego rodzaju kontrola jest mało efektywna, bo na podstawie obrazu z kamer nie da się ustalić, co przewozi się przez granicę – mówi Bas Filippini z holenderskiej organizacji Privacy First. Udowadnia, że cały system służy do szpiegowania obywateli, którzy nie mają żadnych gwarancji, w jaki sposób zostaną wykorzystane te dane.

– Uzyskane z kamer granicznych informacje nie zostaną wykorzystane do ścigania kierowców obciążonych mandatami ani do żadnych podobnych celów – zapewnia rzeczniczka holenderskiego MSW. – Można mieć jedynie nadzieję, że uruchomienie monitoringu granicznego przez Holandię wywoła szerszą dyskusję na temat praw obywateli i dopuszczalnych granic ich inwigilacji przez państwo – mówi Joachim-Fritz Vannahme. Na to się jednak nie zanosi."

Read the entire article in Polish newspaper Rzeczpospolita HERE, or click HERE for an 'English version' in Google Translate.

"Holandija je instalirala kamere na svoje granične prelaze. Te kamere snimaju sva vozila koja u tu državu ulaze iz Belgije i Nemačke. Ovaj postupak je sporan – kritičari u njemu vide čak i kršenje Šengenskog sporazuma.

Kamere o kojima je reč vise na metalnim konstrukcijama pored velikih saobraćajnih znakova. Pored njih, u upotrebi je i šest mobilnih kamera koje se nalaze u vozilima. Sistem ima naziv „Amigo boras" a cilj mu je da – prema zvaničnom tumačenju holandskih vlasti – doprinese suzbijanju šverca ljudi. Zbog toga kamere snimaju prednji deo vozila, dakle, na snimcima se vide registarska tablica, vozač i suvozač. Snimci se porede sa određenim podacima. Tako će na primer, posebna pažnja biti obrađena na furgone sa Balkana: iskustvo je pokazalo da su takvim furgonima u Holandiju prevožene ilegalne prostitutke – samo u takvim slučajevima, policija će smeti i da zaustavi neki automobil radi kontrole.

Mnoge stvari nisu jasne

Mišljenja o novom sistemu kamera su – oprečna. Mnogi stanovnici pograničnog područja kao i putnici koji ulaze u Holandiju zastupaju mišljenje da onaj ko nema šta da krije – nema čega ni da se plaši. Ali, mnogi ovo vide kao još jedan od poteza kojim država zadire u privatnu sferu građana.Posebno važno je pitanje: koliko dugo se čuvaju snimci koje načini „Amigo boras"? Kritičari ukazuju na to da Šengenski sporazum uopšte ne predviđa opšte granične kontrole. Holandska vlada odgovara da će ove kamere raditi samo povremeno, kako bi u konkretnim slučajevima pomogle graničnoj policiji. Holandska organizacija za zaštitu podataka o ličnosti „Privacy first" smatra da „Amigo boras" stvara generalne profile putnika koji dolaze u Holandiju.

„Izgleda kao vojni projekat"

Predsednik pomenute organizacije, Bas Filipini, smatra da novi sistem kamera ne može biti delotvoran: „Oni žele da uđu u trag švercerima ljudi, ali ako u automobilima te osobe sede na zadnjim sedištima, onda ih ionako ne možete videti... Tako ćemo doći do dana kada će snimati sva vozila. Mi želimo da se krećemo bez nadzora" – kaže Filipini, i dodaje da mu čitava akcija izgleda kao neki vojni projekat. Ima i posmatrača koji smatraju da je cilj akcije nešto sasvim drugo, naime, da se ustanovi koliko vozila sa stranim tablicama uopšte ulazi u Holandiju, kako bi moglo da se proceni kakva bi bila korist od uvođenja putarine na tamošnjim auto-putevima.

(...)

Povreda ljudskih prava?

Prema članu 23 Šengenskog sporazuma, jedna država-članica sme ponovo da uvede kontrolu samo u izuzetnim slučajevima i na ograničeno vreme i to „u slučaju velike pretnje javnom redu ili unutrašnjoj bezbednosti". Ta mera sme da traje najduže 30 dana ili onoliko dugo koliko traje „velika pretnja". Šengenske države su se, na primer, pozivale na tu klauzulu uoči određenih velikih sportskih priredbi ili političkih samita. Kritičari novog holandskog sistema nadgledanja granica tvrde da je Holandija oko sebe sagradila „virtuelni zid". I Komisija Evropske unije trenutno vrlo ozbiljno razmatra takve primedbe i pitanje radi li se o povredi prava na privatnost ili, još opštije gledano, o povredi ljudskih prava."

Read the entire article in Deutsche Welle HERE, or click HERE for an 'English version' in Google Translate.

Page 16 of 20

Our Partners

logo Voys Privacyfirst
logo greenhost
logo platfrm
logo AKBA
logo boekx
logo brandeis
 
 
 
banner ned 1024px1
logo demomedia
 
 
 
 
 
Pro Bono Connect logo
privacy coalitie deelnemer

Follow us on Twitter

twitter icon

Follow our RSS-feed

rss icon

Follow us on LinkedIn

linked in icon

Follow us on Facebook

facebook icon